SSJ10020 Global Justice: Towards an Egalitarian Global Order

Academic Year 2021/2022

The objective of this module is to equip students with a clear understanding of and critical perspective on global injustices. We will cover a range of related topics, which will normally include global poverty and inequality; colonialism and post-colonialism; debt and development; neoliberal capitalism; trade, transnational corporations and international tax justice; global gender relations; the global fashion industry; migration; ‘race’ and racism; and environmental justice and climate change. The module will encourage and enable students to analyse inequalities across the economic, political, social and cultural spheres of global society, and to think critically about relations of power at a global level. The module will also explore the role of different groups and institutions in creating or challenging systems of global inequality, including the International Financial Institutions, the United Nations, the G8, transnational corporations, the media, development agencies, NGOs, and social movements.

In addition, we will explore the ways in which development and global justice issues are represented within a European context. Students will be encouraged to reflect upon their own role within global social systems, as global citizens and future professionals. Ways of potentially creating a more sustainable and egalitarian world will be explored throughout.


We encourage you to search for other School of Social Justice (SSJ) modules which include options relating to Equality Studies and Women's Studies. Graduates who have completed at least 15 credits of undergraduate electives offered by the School of Social Justice will have this noted on their UCD transcripts as the completion of Structured Electives in Social Justice.

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Curricular information is subject to change

Learning Outcomes:

On completion of this module students should have developed their ability to:
1. Summarize and explain forces and factors underlying major inequalities globally.
2. Engage with a range of social concepts and theories which help explain global injustices.
3. Demonstrate an ability to evaluate social, political and economic issues within the field of global justice, from a normative and analytical perspective, judging the validity of conclusions reached against available knowledge.
4. Demonstrate critical knowledge of what changes may be required to create a more egalitarian global order.
5. Communicate knowledge and understanding of a range of global justice issues in a clear and coherent manner

Indicative Module Content:

Global poverty and inequality; colonialism and post-colonialism; debt and development; neoliberal capitalism; trade, transnational corporations and international tax justice; global gender relations; the global fashion industry; migration and refugees; ‘race’ and racism; the media and representations of development; environmental justice and climate change.

Student Effort Hours: 
Student Effort Type Hours
Specified Learning Activities

40

Autonomous Student Learning

60

Lectures

24

Total

124

Approaches to Teaching and Learning:
Lectures; critical writing; reflective learning; enquiry & problem-based learning; peer-to-peer learning through discussion; case studies 
Requirements, Exclusions and Recommendations
Learning Requirements:

This is a Level 1 course so there are no pre-requisites


Module Requisites and Incompatibles
Equivalents:
Global Justice (EQUL10020)


 
Assessment Strategy  
Description Timing Open Book Exam Component Scale Must Pass Component % of Final Grade
Multiple Choice Questionnaire: MCQ mid-term assessment 2 Unspecified n/a Alternative linear conversion grade scale 40% No

20

Assignment: End of term project Coursework (End of Trimester) n/a Graded No

60

Multiple Choice Questionnaire: MCQ mid-term assessment 1 Unspecified n/a Alternative linear conversion grade scale 40% No

20


Carry forward of passed components
Yes
 
Resit In Terminal Exam
Autumn No
Please see Student Jargon Buster for more information about remediation types and timing. 
Feedback Strategy/Strategies

• Feedback individually to students, post-assessment
• Group/class feedback, post-assessment
• Online automated feedback

How will my Feedback be Delivered?

Feedback on both MCQs in the form of correct answers to the quizzes will be released online two weeks after each quiz ends, and once any in-term resits have been completed. Students are encouraged to review all their answers, and to take particular note of the correct answers to the questions they answered incorrectly. Students will also receive class feedback on the MCQ during lecture hours. This feedback will concentrate on helping students to understand the correct answers to questions that were answered incorrectly by more than 30% of students. The end-of-term project will be assessed using a qualitative rubric attached to the letter grade awarded. Any exceptional comments that concern issues around academic integrity or late submission will be recorded individually and separately. Any student who fails the assessment will receive an explanation as to why.

Name Role
Dr Krisna Ruette-Orihuela Lecturer / Co-Lecturer
Dr Ernesto Vasquez Del Aguila Lecturer / Co-Lecturer
Ms Judy Walsh Lecturer / Co-Lecturer
Timetabling information is displayed only for guidance purposes, relates to the current Academic Year only and is subject to change.
 
Spring
     
Lecture Offering 1 Week(s) - 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32 Wed 13:00 - 14:50