SOC40080 Policing & Social Conflict

Academic Year 2022/2023

This module examines a number of theoretical perspectives and contemporary debates surrounding the nature and social impact of policing.

It begins by exploring the historical development of the police institution, and considers the various roles and functions associated with the police. It then considers the role that policing plays in wider society, how it relates to various cultural debates, and how it impacts on different sections of the public and intersects with various social conflicts. We examine the role that policing plays in divided societies, looking in detail at political violence and police reform in Northern Ireland. We also explore other developments - including the impact of private security as well as processes of globalisation - in terms of the impact they may have on the nature and delivery of policing and social control.

Throughout the module we will try to enhance our understanding of these issues by considering and debating a series of interrelated questions: (1) what are the main characteristics of policing and social control in modern society, and how have these developed; (2) how do the contours of policing and security provision relate to other features of contemporary society (particularly in terms of inequality, democracy and social change) and what impact do they have on different sectors of society; and (3) how are institutions and processes of policing and social control likely to develop in the future?

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Curricular information is subject to change

Learning Outcomes:

Students who successfully complete this module should be able to:

* describe, assess and critique various sociological theories on the nature of policing and social control generally;
* describe, assess and critique various contemporary debates surrounding the nature of policing and social control in contemporary society; and
* demonstrate an ability to develop a coherent sociological argument around different aspects of policing and social control.

Student Effort Hours: 
Student Effort Type Hours
Specified Learning Activities

220

Seminar (or Webinar)

20

Total

240

Approaches to Teaching and Learning:
The best way to enhance your learning in this module is to maximise your engagement with the content. The more you read the material, the more you think about it, the more you discuss it with others, the more you will learn. The module is structured around this logic.

The module will be delivered in seminars, with a focus on discussion and assessment of key issues and readings. Typically, the seminar will include an overview of some of the key themes relating to the material being covered in each session, and a group discussion of specified readings (this are indicated in the syllabus). The purpose here is not only to ensure that everyone has a good grasp of the arguments being made in the readings, but also to give us an opportunity to reflect on them, to weigh up the strengths and weaknesses of their positions, and ultimately to assess the contribution they make to our understanding of the underlying issues. 
Requirements, Exclusions and Recommendations
Learning Recommendations:

Knowledge of the main traditions of sociological theory, of sociological perspectives on crime, deviance and law, and of criminology.


Module Requisites and Incompatibles
Not applicable to this module.
 
Assessment Strategy  
Description Timing Open Book Exam Component Scale Must Pass Component % of Final Grade
Essay: Essay of 3,000 words approximately Coursework (End of Trimester) n/a Graded No

75

Assignment: Assignment 3 - analysis of discussion readings Varies over the Trimester n/a Graded No

5

Assignment: Assignment 1 - analysis of discussion readings Varies over the Trimester n/a Graded No

5

Assignment: Assignment 5 - analysis of discussion readings Varies over the Trimester n/a Graded No

5

Assignment: Assignment 2 - analysis of discussion readings Varies over the Trimester n/a Graded No

5

Assignment: Assignment 4 - analysis of discussion readings Varies over the Trimester n/a Graded No

5


Carry forward of passed components
No
 
Resit In Terminal Exam
Spring No
Please see Student Jargon Buster for more information about remediation types and timing. 
Feedback Strategy/Strategies

• Feedback individually to students, post-assessment
• Group/class feedback, post-assessment

How will my Feedback be Delivered?

Feedback will be provided on assessed coursework as individual comments published in the VLE, in group sessions at lectures/seminars, and/or in person during office hours as appropriate.

Timetabling information is displayed only for guidance purposes, relates to the current Academic Year only and is subject to change.
 
Autumn
     
Lecture Offering 1 Week(s) - 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12 Wed 10:00 - 11:50