POL36120 Gender, Religion & Colonialism

Academic Year 2023/2024

This module provides an overview of key issues in the triangular intersection of gender, religion, and colonialism. While aiming to bring together the literature Western and non-Western contexts on these debates, the module introduces the students the key texts in feminist theory, feminist religious studies, masculinities and religion, and postcolonial and decolonial feminism from a critical interdisciplinary perspective.

NOTE: POL36120 is the new code for the module that was taught as POL30680 during Spring 2023.

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Curricular information is subject to change

Learning Outcomes:

- Introduce students to the issues in the intersection of gender, religion, and colonialism.
- Evaluate and question competing perspectives on key issues and public debates from a multidisciplinary perspective
- Familiarise students with the foundations of feminist theory, gender theory, postcolonial theory, and decolonial thought
- Encourage students to interconnect theory and real life examples
- Rethink, challenge, self-reflect on naturalised assumptions on gender, religion, and politics.
- Enhance critical analysis skills
- Improve discussion skills
- Practice forming and synthesising strong arguments based on scholarly research
- Develop independent research skills
- Enhance writing skills

Indicative Module Content:

Possible themes might include:

- Gender, Religion, and Place: Decolonising Vocabularies
- Gender and Post/Secularism
- Gender and Religion: Under Western Eyes
- Gender, Religion, and the Nation/State
- Gender, Race, and Religion
- Gender, Religion, and Environment
- Gender, Religion, and Agency
- Feminist Re-interpretations of Religion
- Religion and Sexualities
- Gender, Religion, and Law

Student Effort Hours: 
Student Effort Type Hours
Autonomous Student Learning

200

Lectures

24

Total

224

Approaches to Teaching and Learning:
Teaching and learning activities will require students to engage with current academic research and to link theories of gender, religion, and colonialism to specific empirical cases.
Through class discussions, activities, and essay writing students will examine how scholarly research on gender, religion, and colonialism can inform and deepen our understanding of contemporary political events.
The students will also be encouraged to apply their learning to a diverse range of empirical cases in order to fully develop an understanding of the benefits and limitations of using scholarly research to analysis the gender, religion, and colonialism.
The students will be expected to prepare thoroughly for each of the classes, particularly engaging with core readings, and to allocate a substantial amount of time to the completion of assessment work outside the classroom hours. 
Requirements, Exclusions and Recommendations

Not applicable to this module.


Module Requisites and Incompatibles
Not applicable to this module.
 
Assessment Strategy  
Description Timing Open Book Exam Component Scale Must Pass Component % of Final Grade
Essay: Research Paper Throughout the Trimester n/a Graded No

60

Assignment: Reflection Paper #1 Varies over the Trimester n/a Graded No

20

Assignment: Reflection Paper #2 Varies over the Trimester n/a Graded No

20


Carry forward of passed components
Yes
 
Resit In Terminal Exam
Spring No
Please see Student Jargon Buster for more information about remediation types and timing. 
Feedback Strategy/Strategies

• Feedback individually to students, post-assessment

How will my Feedback be Delivered?

In line with university policy students will be provided with feedback within 20 days of the deadline for submitting the assignment.

Timetabling information is displayed only for guidance purposes, relates to the current Academic Year only and is subject to change.
 
Autumn
     
Lecture Offering 1 Week(s) - 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12 Tues 16:00 - 17:50