PHIL40410 Philosophy & Literature

Academic Year 2021/2022

In this course we will approach the relationship between philosophy and literature through a phenomenological framework by asking: 'what is the experience of reading philosophy and what is the experience of reading literature?' The aim is to discover the manner in which each genre of text reveals something of the human experience but to precisely question the extent to which that revelation actually impacts upon the reader's experience of being human. Towards these ends we will broadly investigate the theme of nationalism drawing on the work of post-Kantian European thinkers and authors.

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Curricular information is subject to change

Learning Outcomes:

An appreciation of the relationship between philosophy and literature and the ways in which they complicate and enrich one another. The ability to participate in high-level critical discussions of both philosophical and literary texts. A familiarity with all of the required primary readings and an engagement with the works under discussion. The ability to draw connections between philosophical and literary texts, and to compare and contrast them in written work as appropriate. An understanding of the role of texts in the production of national identities.

Indicative Module Content:

In this course we will approach the relationship between philosophy and literature through a phenomenological framework by asking: 'what is the experience of reading philosophy and what is the experience of reading literature?' The aim is to discover the manner in which each genre of text reveals something of the human experience but to precisely question the extent to which that revelation actually impacts upon the reader's experience of being human. Towards these ends we will broadly investigate the theme of nationalism drawing on the work of post-Kantian European thinkers and authors.

What is nationalism? What is a 'national literature' or a 'national philosophy'? What is the role of language in the production of national identity? What is the role of philosophy and literature the production of national identity? Is there such a thing as a good nationalism or is it always chauvinistic and exclusionary? What is the relationship between a particular nationalism and discourses that often aim at universality (such as philosophy)? Thinkers covered will primarily be from the continental tradition such as Derrida, Fichte, Schelling, Rousseau, Cassin, Butler, Balibar. Suggested literary authors will include Barnes, Mantel, Barry, Joyce, Boland, Yeates, McGuckian and others. However, students are strongly encouraged to bring their own literary examples to class discussions and research.

Student Effort Hours: 
Student Effort Type Hours
Seminar (or Webinar)

24

Autonomous Student Learning

226

Total

250

Approaches to Teaching and Learning:
Seminars, assessment and independent learning.

 
Requirements, Exclusions and Recommendations
Learning Recommendations:

It is recommended that students doing this module should have some prior knowledge of philosophy. You are advised to consult the module co-ordinator in advance of selecting this module if you have not previously studied philosophy.


Module Requisites and Incompatibles
Not applicable to this module.
 
Assessment Strategy  
Description Timing Open Book Exam Component Scale Must Pass Component % of Final Grade
Essay: Essay on themes and thinkers from the course. Topic decided by student in consultation with the MC. Coursework (End of Trimester) n/a Graded No

75

Continuous Assessment: Short weekly reflections on set readings. Throughout the Trimester n/a Graded No

25


Carry forward of passed components
Yes
 
Resit In Terminal Exam
Autumn No
Please see Student Jargon Buster for more information about remediation types and timing. 
Feedback Strategy/Strategies

• Feedback individually to students, post-assessment

How will my Feedback be Delivered?

Feedback will be provided individually on each piece of assignment.

Timetabling information is displayed only for guidance purposes, relates to the current Academic Year only and is subject to change.
 
Spring
     
Lecture Offering 1 Week(s) - 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32 Wed 11:00 - 12:50