MEEN41160 Musculoskeletal Biomechanics and Mechanobiology

Academic Year 2022/2023

The tissues and organs of our musculoskeletal system facilitate motion, flexibility and strength throughout the lifecourse. Mechanical loading is key to the healthy development and function of cartilage, bone, muscles, tendon and the spine. These tissues and structures are optimised to fulfil their biomechanical, as well as their physiological, functions. At the cell level, organelles and structures such as ion channels and integrins regulate the response of cells to mechanical loading in both healthy and diseased states and transitions. In this module, students will gain a comprehensive understanding of the biomechanics and mechanobiology of the musculoskeletal system. Through a range of task-oriented activities, including presentations, peer discussions, peer review and report writing, students will develop a critical awareness of current problems and recent innovations in the field of musculoskeletal biomechanics and mechanobiology.

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Curricular information is subject to change

Learning Outcomes:

At the end of this module, students will be able to:
- demonstrate a systematic understanding of how mechanical forces influence the formation, physiology, disease and degeneration of the musculoskeletal system through a) individual presentations and b) an end of term multiple choice question test.
- Calculate the loads acting in a range of musculoskeletal tissues, assessed through two problem sheets
- use tools and packages frequently used in musculoskeletal biomechanics and mechanobiology industry and research for finite element analysis and musculoskeletal modelling, assessed through a lab report.
- demonstrate a critical awareness of current problems and recent innovations in the field of orthopaedics in a) giving and peer-assessing individual presentations and b) peer discussions of key papers from the literature.
- Critically evaluate current research in the field of musculoskeletal biomechanics and mechanobiology through a) peer discussions of key papers from the literature, and b) their research report.
- Propose new hypotheses to address identified gaps at the forefront of orthopaedic biomechanics and mechanobiology through their research report

Student Effort Hours: 
Student Effort Type Hours
Autonomous Student Learning

70

Lectures

24

Practical

12

Total

106

Approaches to Teaching and Learning:
This module will use a wide range of teaching and learning approaches, including lectures, task-based learning, problem-based learning, computer lab work, critical writing, student presentations and debates. 
Requirements, Exclusions and Recommendations

Not applicable to this module.


Module Requisites and Incompatibles
Not applicable to this module.
 
Assessment Strategy  
Description Timing Open Book Exam Component Scale Must Pass Component % of Final Grade
Assignment: Problem sheet Varies over the Trimester n/a Graded No

7

Presentation: Research proposal presentation Unspecified n/a Graded No

5

Project: Research proposal report Unspecified n/a Graded No

35

Multiple Choice Questionnaire: Multiple choice questionnaire testing understanding of how mechanical forces influence the formation, physiology, disease and degeneration of the musculoskeletal system End of trimester MCQ n/a Graded No

20

Lab Report: Lab reports on a) FE Bio and b) OpenSim (5% each) Varies over the Trimester n/a Graded No

10

Presentation: Student topic presentations. 6% for presentation and 4% for peer-assessment of others presentations Unspecified n/a Graded No

10

Continuous Assessment: Online discussion forums of relevant topics. Seven topics will be discussed: 1–3% for each topic (percentage depends on topic and will be communicated) Throughout the Trimester n/a Graded No

13


Carry forward of passed components
No
 
Resit In Terminal Exam
Summer No
Please see Student Jargon Buster for more information about remediation types and timing. 
Feedback Strategy/Strategies

• Feedback individually to students, on an activity or draft prior to summative assessment
• Feedback individually to students, post-assessment
• Group/class feedback, post-assessment
• Peer review activities

How will my Feedback be Delivered?

Feedback on the problem sheets, the lab reports and the literature discussions will be given individually on drafts prior to assessment in drop-in sessions, and in class post-assessment. Prior to assessment, feedback will be given individually on drafts of the presentation and the research proposal prior to assessment in drop-in sessions. Post assessment, feedback on the presentation from the instructors and from peer review will be provided individually through the VLE. Post-assessment individual feedback on the research proposal will be provided through the VLE using rubrics.

Timetabling information is displayed only for guidance purposes, relates to the current Academic Year only and is subject to change.
 
Spring
     
Lecture Offering 1 Week(s) - 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33 Thurs 11:00 - 12:50
Computer Aided Lab Offering 1 Week(s) - 21, 22, 25, 26 Wed 11:00 - 11:50
Tutorial Offering 1 Week(s) - 23, 24, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33 Wed 11:00 - 11:50
Spring